Rethinking the Art of Subtitles

By Grant Rosenberg/Paris Tuesday, May 15, 2007 Early on in the 2004 supernatural Russian thriller Night Watch, the protagonist, trying to prevent a witch from casting a spell on his unborn child, yells at the top of his lungs in protest. For English-speaking audiences, the subtitles do more than just translate the literal meaning: the words “no” and “stop” with three

» Read more

On Books in Translation in the American Market

September 15, 2014 The German Book Office’s Riky Stock spoke to editors and publishers about the factors at play when considering publishing a translation in the US market. By Katharina Rapp Which foreign books are interesting to American publishers? How do they find these books and who is involved in the translation process? What role does translation funding play and

» Read more

The Poet Cannot Stand Aside: Arabic Literature and Exile

M. Lynx Qualey Fourteen hundred years ago and more, the poet-prince Imru’ al-Qais was banished by his father. The king exiled his son, or so the legend goes, in part because of the prince’s poetry. Thus it was that, when the king was killed by a group of his subjects, al-Qais was traveling with friends. Al-Qais returned to avenge his

» Read more

Interpreting Conflict: Training Challenges in Humanitarian Field Interpreting

Barbara Moser-Mercer, Leïla Kherbiche and Barbara Class* Journal of Human Rights Practice (2014) 6(1): 140-158. doi: 10.1093/jhuman/hut025 First published online: January 6, 2014   Abstract When communication breaks down, conflict ensues. Resolving conflicts successfully relies heavily on re-establishing communication. Almost all conflicts involve parties who do not speak the same language or share the same culture. Language is the main vehicle of communication under such difficult circumstances, and

» Read more

Cosmopolitanism as Translation

Esperança Bielsa Universitat Autònoma de Barcelona, Spain Published in Cultural Sociology, online before print September 2, 2014, doi:10.1177/1749975514546235   Abstract Whereas globalization theory was predominantly silent about the role of translation in making possible the flow of information worldwide, assuming instant communicability and transparency, translation has gained central importance in recent accounts of cosmopolitanism that emphasize global interdependence and the negotiation

» Read more

“A Bitter Disappointment,” Edward Said on His Encounter with Sartre, De Beauvoir and Foucault

AUGUST 26, 2014 EUGENE WOLTERS In 1979, Edward Said was invited by Jean-Paul Sartre and Simone de Beauvoir to France for a conference on Middle East peace. It was in the wake of the Camp David Accords that ended the war between Egypt and Israel, that the author of “Orientalism” and ardent supporter of the Palestinian people, was invited to contribute with other

» Read more

The Case of the Arabic Noirs

  August 20, 2014 | by Jonathan Guyer Cairo: the metal detector beeps. The security man wears a crisp white uniform. He nods and leans back in his chair. The lobby’s red oriental carpet, so worn it’s barely red, leads upstairs to the hotel tavern. Enter the glass doors, where a cat in a smart bow tie and vest reaches for a lonely

» Read more

Institution, Translation, Nation, Metaphor

LUCAS KLEIN Comparative Literature is defined in part by anxiety about its institutionality. Approaching translations as works of literary scholarship equivalent to our articles and monographs can address this anxiety and also work against the Herderian assumptions of national literatures. Ultimately, the comparison of comparative literature is a metaphorical process, putting it in the same process of negotiated familiarity and

» Read more
1 7 8 9