Tell Me How It Ends: An Essay in 40 Questions

By Valeria Luiselli Publisher: Coffee House Press Year: 2017 ISBN: 9781566894968 American Book Award Winner: A “moving, intimate” account of serving as a translator for undocumented children facing deportation ( The New York Times Book Review ). Nonfiction Finalist for the Kirkus Prize Finalist for National Book Critics Circle Award for Criticism Structured around the forty questions volunteer worker Valeria

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“What is in a preposition?”: Reading Turkish Literature as World Literature

Review of Burcu Alkan and Çimen Günay-Erkol, eds. Turkish Literature as World Literature. NY: Bloomsbury Academic, 2021. Mehtap Ozdemir, 22 July 2021, published in The Medium Conventionally traced back to Goethe’s conceptualization of the term Weltliteratur in the early decades of the nineteenth century, world literature has gained traction both as a critical construct and an academic field in the past

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From text to data: Mediality in corpus-based translation studies

Jan Buts & Henry Jones MonTI: Monografías de Traducción e Interpretación URI: http://rua.ua.es/dspace/handle/10045/115357 Abstract This paper seeks to promote deeper reflection within the field of corpus-based translation studies (CTS) regarding the digital tools by means of which research in this discipline proceeds. It explicates a range of possibilities and constraints brought to the analysis of translated texts by the keyword

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Epistemologies of Evidence-based Medicine

Buts, Jan, Mona Baker, Saturnino Luz and Eivind Engebretsen (2021) ‘Epistemologies of Evidence-based Medicine: A plea for corpus-based conceptual research in the medical humanities’, Medicine, Health Care and Philosophy. https://doi-org.ezproxy.uio.no/10.1007/s11019-021-10027-2 OPEN ACCESS https://link-springer-com.ezproxy.uio.no/article/10.1007/s11019-021-10027-2 Abstract Evidence-based medicine has been the subject of much controversy within and outside the field of medicine, with its detractors characterizing it as reductionist and authoritarian, and

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Who You’re Reading When You’re Reading Arab Women

When Arab women are translated into English, the characters often reflect the prejudices of Westerners M. Lynx Qualey M. Lynx Qualey is founding editor of the translation-community website ArabLit Newlines Magazine, April 9, 2021   Arab women’s writing was slow to be translated from Arabic to English. Eighteenth and 19th century Orientalists focused largely on canonizing medieval men. Certainly, their

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Rebecca Johnson’s ‘Stranger Fictions: The History of the Novel in Arabic Translation’

In Stranger Fictions: A History of the Novel in Arabic Translation, Rebecca C.  Johnson looks at the role that literary translations and adaptations played in the Arabic novel of the late nineteenth and early twentieth centuries: By Tugrul Mende Through Johnson’s book, we get a glimpse of literary consumption, productions, and circulation during the Nahda period — the final decades of the nineteenth

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English translation: Janice Deul’s opinion piece about Gorman/Rijneveld

by Haidee Kotze Medium, 18 March 2021   What follows is an English translation of Janice Deul’s opinion piece (in Dutch) published by De Volkskrant (25 February 2021), carried out with her permission. The article prompted widespread debate; the interpretations of many of the subsequent contributors to this debate raise questions about their engagement with the article itself. This translation

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25 years of The Translator: Mona Baker, Moira Inghilleri and Dirk Delabastita in conversation with Sue-Ann Harding and Loredana Polezzi

The Translator Volume 26, No. 3, 2020 Pages 297-309 | Published online: 11 Jan 2021   OPEN ACCESS   This conversation, which took place in the summer of 2020, traces 25 years of publishing The Translator, from its inception and early days, to its establishment as a leading international publication in the field of Translation Studies, to the move from St

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Translating COVID-19 and Japan: A Historical Reflection on the Social Standing of Scientists

Ruselle Meade (Cardiff University, United Kingdom) May 21, 2020 Notes from the Field As a crisis that inevitably mixes politics with science, the COVID-19 pandemic has heightened the visibility of scientists. Political leaders the world over are keen to stress that their responses to the pandemic are “driven by science.” It was warnings from the government’s panel of scientific experts, argued

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