Samah Selim: Translator’s Introduction to Arwa Salih’s The Stillborn

Arwa Salih. The Stillborn: Notebooks of a Woman from the Student Movement Generation in Egypt. Trans. Samah Selim. London, New York, Calcutta: Seagull Books, Forthcoming 2017. Translator’s Introduction[1] Arwa Salih was an Egyptian communist who came of political age in the early 1970s; in the aftermath of the Arab-Israeli War of 1967, the end of the Nasser era, and the […]

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Internet wasn’t real hero of Egypt

By Rebecca MacKinnon, Special to CNN February 12, 2011 Editor’s note: Rebecca MacKinnon is a Bernard L. Schwartz senior fellow at the New America Foundation, co-founder of the international bloggers’ network Global Voices Online and a founding member of the Global Network Initiative. Her book, “Consent of the Networked,” will be published this year by Basic Books.  (CNN) — When asked what he thought of […]

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Arwa Salih’s The Premature: Gendering the History of the Egyptian Left

By Hanan Hammed This article examines the intellectual legacy of the Egyptian Marxist Arwa Salih (1953-97) in order to trace an intimate history of the Egyptian left. Gender relations among comrades have underpinned the movement that has enveloped women’s rights in the folds of national and class struggles. In her short life, Salih was a veteran underground activist and, from […]

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The prefigurative politics of translation in place-based movements of protest

Subtitling in the Egyptian Revolution DOI: 10.1080/13556509.2016.1148438 (link to prepublication version at end of post) Mona Baker, The Translator, Volume 22, Number 1, 2016, pages 1-21 Abstract The idea of prefiguration is widely assumed to derive from anarchist discourse; it involves experimenting with currently available means in such a way that they come to mirror or actualise the political ideals that […]

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Hope without Illusion: Ten Signs of Change in Egypt

by Abdelrahman Mansour and Mohamed Aboelgheit Jadaliyya, 14 May 2016 Egyptians occupying streets, blocking traffic, and chanting patriotic slogans: Contrary to conventional wisdom, these images became part of Egypt’s contemporary political arena well before the January 2011 Revolution. We saw them on multiple occasions in 2006, 2008, and even in 2010, when Egypt’s national football team won the Africa Cup of Nations. Those are […]

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Tahrir Square sexual assaults reported during anniversary clashes

Campaigners in Egypt say at least 25 women have been assaulted as state of emergency is declared in three provinces Patrick Kingsley in Cairo Monday 28 January 2013   Amid Egypt’s ongoing civil unrest, at least 25 women have been sexually assaulted during clashes in Tahrir Square, according to local women’s rights campaigners. In a typical attack, crowds of men quickly […]

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Angels caught in a tightening noose

By Soraya Morayef Open Democracy, 13 November 2013 Many disregard the recurrent stories of prison deaths, police torture and rape because – on the other hand – Egypt’s streets are empty after curfew and the walls are freshly painted; surely a clear indication that the state has succeeded in restoring security and defeating terrorism. On Tuesday November 5, Egypt’s Minister […]

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The Seven Wonders of the Revolution

By Soraya Morayef Jadaliyya, 22 May 2012 Around the corner from Tahrir Square, the heart of Egypt’s eighteen-day uprising, Mohamed Mahmud Street bears the scars of a turbulent political year in Egypt. The once-bustling street off of Tahrir Square has seen its share of violent battlefields–beginning with 28 January 2011 and ending with the February 2012 clashes following the Port […]

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Meeting Essam Sharaf: Time for Truth and Reconciliation?

By Soraya Morayef 15 July 2012 Over the past sixteen months, much has been written about Egypt’s leaderless revolution, with many blaming its seeming sluggishness on the absence of a single figure to unite and represent the now fragmented revolutionary forces. To me, and perhaps others, Essam Sharaf was—however briefly—a potential candidate for this task. On 4 March 2011, right […]

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Egypt—The Revolution Will Continue

Women’s Media Centre, 20 January 2012 By Hoda Elsadda January 25 marks the anniversary of the onset of protests in Cairo’s Tahrir Square. Here, Hoda Elsadda, an Egyptian women’s rights activist and professor at Cairo University, assesses women’s gains, potential losses and determination to move forward—as evidenced by last month’s 10,000-woman strong protest march. One year ago, the Egyptian people […]

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